Posts Tagged ‘amazon’

Birdwatcher: Accessing Calico/BIRD metrics through Prometheus

Friday, October 28th, 2016

Today we’re happy to announce that Birdwatcher is now available on ‚Äčour company’s GitHub page. It accesses Calico/BIRD metrics through Prometheus. If you’re a user of both Calico and Prometheus, be sure to give it a try. Enjoy!

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awssyncer: an automatic syncer for Amazon S3 that makes use of inotify

Friday, September 16th, 2016

At Kumina, we’re strong users of the Amazon AWS cloud computing platform. We’ve been using EC2 instances for quite some time and are currently working on expanding this by making use of Kubernetes. To further optimise our solutions, we’ve developed a new utility called awssyncer, which is as of now available on GitHub! awssyncer is a utility written in C++ that uses Linux’s inotify to keep track of local modifications to a directory on disk. The purpose of this utility is to use these inotify events to determine which files need to be synced back into S3. This utility thus provides continuous one-way sychronisation from local disk to S3. A simple container startup script is used to sync files from S3 to local disk on startup. Though we realise that this utility is fairly specific to our situation at hand, we do invite all of you to give it a try.

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Publishing EC2 scripts on GitHub

Friday, April 29th, 2011

We’re glad to announce that we’ve published our set of EC2 scripts on GitHub! The repository contains current versions of the code described in our previous two blog posts on EC2.

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Automatically creating entries in PowerDNS for Amazon EC2 instances

Monday, April 18th, 2011

By default, instances created on Amazon EC2 will have a randomly assigned IPv4 address, which is why we’ve written a script to automatically create DNS entries in PowerDNS for instances managed through EC2.

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Kumina into the cloud; creating Amazon EC2 images

Wednesday, April 13th, 2011

In order to make use of Amazon EC2 to its full potential, it is important that we can quickly spawn Debian installations that are automatically configured using Puppet. We accomplish this by creating our own Kumina-branded Amazon Machine Image (AMI).

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